Rumahoy – Time II: Party Review

Score9/10
GenreFolk Power Metal (Pirate Metal)
CountryArgentina
Runtime38:29
Release Date25 October 2019
Record LabelIndependent

Blowing in only a year after their debut, the self-proclaimed “Best True Scottish Pirate Metal Band in the World” Rumahoy are back with another booze-fueled party album ready to go: Time II: Party. After sailing the seas of the Wild West, Captain Yarrface and his skimask-clad crew have written ten catchy sea shanties of the most fucking ridiculous variety. Within you’ll find the expected power/folk metal combo that’s typical of pirate metal, but with a variety and dynamism that’s all but unseen in the genre.

As with any comedic metal band, like Nanowar, Alestorm, Tenacious D, or Gloryhammer, the jokes and humour are definitely important, but the true key to success is the music itself. If you take away the hilarity of the lyrics, the music should still be able to hold its own, otherwise the act gets pretty old pretty fast. Fortunately, the talented Rumahoy have fucking nailed their songwriting, so, while you’re not busy laughing your ass of at things like “Hooks out for Harambe!” and “pirate erection”, you can appreciate the musical arrangements almost as much.

As far as contrast goes, these party pirates have nailed that, too. ‘1000 Years of Dust’ brings a darker, heavier sound than the rest of the album (as you’d expect from a song about pirates kidnapped by mummies), and there’s the electropop dance tune ‘Poop Deck Party’ which features some unexpected rapping by Gloryhammer/Alestorm founder Christoper Bowes. Every track on the album commands a contagious, heroic energy, along with anthemic “yo-ho-ho”s, “oogachaga”s, or similar chantable choruses and killer grooves and riffs. Group that together with clean mixing and a tight band, and you’ve got yourself an unstoppable pirate force.

If you like your pirate metal with a heavy serving of sick riffs, ripping solos, jokes about poop, and the occasional cheesy keyboards, this album is exactly what you need. Rumahoy have effortlessly outdone all of their competition with Time II: Party. It’s fun, it’s clever, and it’s crazy good.

If you want to be notified every time PowerThorn publishes a review or article, you can subscribe to the blog or go like the >>Facebook Page<<!
For all the same (but mostly memes), >>@PowerThorn<< on Instagram is exactly what you need.

Stay Metal \m/

Top Ten Metal Albums Of September

It’s been a crazy month on my side of things, but it’s been even crazier in the metal world. There was almost more to listen to this month than there was for the entire summer, so, needless to say, my Top Ten Metal Albums of September had a few runner ups.

10. Ancient Empire – Wings of the Fallen

While not exceptional by their own standards, Ancient Empires Wings of the Fallen is an excellent traditional metal record. With solid, chugging riffs and strong melodies, it’s everything you’d want in classic heavy metal, plus a bit extra.

09. Excalion – Emotions

Melodic, expressive, keyboard-driven. It doesn’t take many more words that that to get me excited about an album. These characteristics are hardly unique when it comes to power metal, and more often than not I’m left disappointed upon actually hearing an album described by them, but, what can I say? I’m a hopeful guy. So, you can imagine my relief when Excalion laid this piece of work before me. Emotions is the fifth album of the Finnish outfit, and it checks all those boxes with massive checkmarks.

Full Review

08. Ereb Altor – Jartecken

Ereb Altor are no stranger to viking metal. With eight albums since their 2008 debut, they’ve worked steadily to bring the best of true viking metal. Their latest album, Jartecken, is pretty much what you’d expect at this point, but that isn’t to say it isn’t something new, too; it continues down the same path as the past couple albums, delivering a dynamic mix of mournful folk melodies and vicious atmospheres.

Full Review

07. DragonForce – Extreme Power Metal

DragonForce is back with their best album of the decade: Extreme Power Metal. One thing EPM does better than, well, every album up to Reaching into Infinity is variety. It has your typical, fast-paced power metal bangers like ‘Troopers of the Stars’ and ‘Cosmic Power of the Infinite Shred’, as well as a surplus of more commercial, poppy songs. There are a few songs that aren’t driven solely by spine-splitting speed, such ‘Remembrance Day’ and the excellent cover of Celine Dion’s ‘My Heart Will Go On’, but the intense dragon energy is never lost. There are also a lot of instrumental breaks that utilize strings, folk instruments, and the usual videogame SFX that are so characteristic of DragonForce. These video game themes run strong, with most of the songs having retro synth (or outright 8-bit) intros. Unsurprisingly, ‘The Last Dragonborn’ is the most videogame-fueled of them all, albeit more in content and less in sound.

Full Review

06. Borknagar – True North

Norway’s black/folk masters Borknagar pumps out great albums on the worst of days, so it should be no surprise that True North is on this list. In a word, the album is captivating. Between thunderous highs and serene lows, it’s as if Borknagar have invoked the very spirits of the mountains. To add to this dynamism, the album makes use of everything from clean vocals and bouncy grooves to furious blastbeats and skin-tearing growls. Of all the “winter-themed” albums to come out this month (like Everfrost’s Winterider and Sonata Arctica’s fucking mess), this one embodies that theme the best.

05. Cerebellar Rondo – The Realizing

It’s been a little while since I’ve heard a decent new Japanese power metal album, so it caught me off guard when the first one I’d heard in months swept me off my feet the way The Realizing did. The debut of Cerebellar Rondo, it’s fast, pleasantly melodic, and displays all of the flare and technicality that keeps bringing me back to Japanese power metal. Aside from the killer vocal performance, there are some seriously cool riffs that separate Cerebellar Rondo from a lot of the other (albeit still good) Japanese power metal bands.

04. Everfrost – Winterider

From the frozen north of Finland come Everfrost with their sophomore album, Winterider, which is one of the most expressive symphonic power metal albums of the year. The band bleeds musical excellence and, when their power is directed into over-the-top, cheerfully epic arrangements, they produce a truly unique sound, even by power metal standards. Everfrost’s winter-themed metal shows clear influences ranging from Blind Guardian to late-80s glam metal to Queen, which further pushes the boundaries of what you might expect from this genre.

Full Review

03. Centurion – Centurion

Centurion is an insatiable riff-beast, ready to prey on the ears of all who are close enough to listen. Not only that, but we’re also attacked with an onslaught of powerful melodies, facemelting solos (especially in ‘Ruka Sudbine’ and ‘Virtuelno Ognjiste’. Holy fuck.), and drumming that never settles for satisfactory. Seriously. This is one damn impressive group of musicians who are as mighty as the badass warriors on their album cover.

Full Review

02. Kybalion – Black Painted Skies

If you want a bit of a change from the usual 16th-based, djenty, instrumental modern prog that has recently flooded the metal world, give this EP a spin. Black Painted Skies is the first release (they call it an EP but I would consider it a full-out album, but maybe that’s just me) from America’s brand new instrumental proggers, Kybalion. This speed demon of death is super heavy and its ever-changing form will have you happily kissing the comfortability of 4/4 goodbye. With a diverse mix of highs, lows, feels, and time signatures, it’s evident that this trio doesn’t fuck around.

Full Review

01. Wind Rose – Wintersaga

Well, summer’s over. That means the time for beaches, bimbos, and barbecues is at it’s end, being instead replaced by the dark, wind, and cold. However, this is the perfect season for a dwarf! And what better way to explore your potential dwarfhood than cranking out the meanest, mightiest of man-metal? Enter Wind Rose, Italy’s finest dwarf metal army, and their fourth album, Wintersaga. As the band’s most impressive album to date, it’s as if it was smithed in the forges of Khazad-dum itself. If its epic chants and upbeat hymns aren’t enough to get you into the season, they’ll at least get your blood flowing hard enough to keep you warm.

Full Review

Did I miss something worthy of being a Top Ten? Bitch at me in the comments or send me a message!

If you want to be notified every time PowerThorn publishes a review or article, you can subscribe to the blog or go like the >>Facebook Page<<!
For all the same (but mostly memes), >>@PowerThorn<< on Instagram is exactly what you need.

Stay Metal \m/

Metal Album Release Calendar – October, November, December 2019

This is a calendar of metal albums for Fall and Winter of 2019. Want to see what came out earlier this year? Check out the full Metal Album Release Calendar for 2019!

NAVIGATION SUPER PRO TIP:
Looking for a specific genre or just sick of scrolling to the bottom of the page? Hit Ctrl+F on your computer or click “Search in Page” in your phone menu and type in a keyword.

1 October:

High Moonlight – Arcturians (Heavy Metal) [EP]

Asuryan – The Eye of Ra (Folk Metal)

Ente – Eterna (Progressive power Metal) [EP]

Grendel’s Syster – Myrtle Wreath / Myrtenkranz (Heavy Folk Metal) [EP]

High Moonlight – Arcturians (Heavy Metal) [EP]

Narwhale – Heart of the Corpse​-​Whale (Progressive Metal)

2 October:

Sereptah – Acoustic (Progressive Power Metal)

Cover My Sigh – Set the World Aflame (Progressive Metal)

Alicia Out of Wonderland – Entre la muerte y el amor (Heavy Power Metal)

4 October:

Iron Kingdom – On the Hunt (Heavy Metal)

Chur – Four-Faced (Folk Metal)

Crow’s Flight – The Storm (Heavy Metal)

Forgotten North – Kinder des Zorns (Symphonic Folk Metal)

Yurei – Saudade (Progressive Metal)

Dawn of Destiny – The Beast Inside (Power Metal)

Fought Upon Earth – Grave Miscalculation (Progressive Metal)

Knightmare – Space Knights (Heavy Power Metal)

The Fall of Eve – Nevermore (Symphonic Metal) [EP]

6 October:

Midnight Force – Gododdin (Heavy Metal)

Iron Attack! – Japonism (Progressive Power Metal)

9 October:

MistFolk – Королева воронья (Folk Metal)

Orthanc – Carnival (Heavy Metal)

Vinnie Moore – Soul Shifter (Shred)

11 October:

The Ferrymen – A New Evil (Power Metal)

Eclipse – Paradigm (Hard Rock/Heavy Metal)

Ethereal Kingdoms – Hollow Mirror (Symphonic Metal)

Screamer – Highway of Heroes (Heavy Metal)

Silent Call – Windows (Progressive Metal)

Stargate – The Dream (Heavy Power Metal)

Unleash the Archers – Explorers (Power Metal) [EP]

FireForce – The Iron Brigade (Power Metal) [EP]

Vanden Plas – The Ghost Xperiment: Awakening (Progressive Metal)

15 October:

Arcane Tales – Power of the Sky (Symphonic Power Metal)

16 October:

Magistina Saga -Invite in the Story (Symphonic Gothic Metal) [EP]

18 October:

Nifrost – Blykrone (Viking Metal)

Secret Chapter – Chapter One (Heavy Metal)

Valcata – Valcata (Symphonic Metal)

Danger Zone – Dont Count on Heroes (Heavy Power Metal)

Induction – Induction (Power Metal)

Aerodyne – Damnation (Heavy Metal)

Rexoria – Ice Breaker (Heavy Metal)

Tandra – Time and Eternity (Folk Metal)

Armored Dawn – Viking Zombie (Power Metal)

Don’t Drop the Sword – The Wild Hunt (Power Metal) [EP]

23 October:

Galneryus – Into the Purgatory (Power Metal)

25 October:

Edenbridge – Dynamind (Symphonic Metal)

Metalite – Biomechanicals (Melodic Metal)

Moon Chamber – Lore of the Land (Heavy Metal)

Noveria – Aequilibrium (Progressive Power Metal)

Savage Master – Myth, Magic, and Steel (Heavy Metal)

Millennium – A New World (Heavy Metal)

Steve Blower – Back in Hell (Heavy Metal)

Turbokill – Vice World (Heavy Metal)

Hevisaurus – Bändikouluun! (Heavy Power Metal)

Dragonfly – Zeitgeist (Heavy Power Metal)

Cathubodua – Continuum (Symphonic Metal)

Rumahoy – Time II: Party (Folk Metal)

Vision Divine – When All the Heroes Are Dead (Progressive Power Metal)

Velvet Viper – The Pale Man is Holding a Boken Heart (Heavy Power Metal)

28 October:

Ironsword – In the Coils of Set (Heavy Metal) [EP]

Bloody Times – By Metal, We Send You to Hell (Heavy Metal) [EP]

30 October:

Elvarhøi – Dansen låter fra graven åter (Folk Metal)

31 October:

Apotheus – The Far Star (Progressive Metal)

Horizon’s End – Skeleton Keys (Progressive Metal)

1 November:

Angel Witch – Angel of Light (Heavy Metal)

Legendry – The Wizard and the Tower Keep (Heavy Power Metal)

Wilderun – Veil of Imagination (Symphonic Folk Metal)

Voyager – Colours in the Sun (Progressive Metal)

Wotan – The Song of the Nibelungs (Heavy Metal)

Dagor Sorhdeam – Fog of War (Power Metal)

French Maide – The Rat (Power Metal)

KingCrown – A Perfect World (Heavy Power Metal)

5 November:

IronThorn – Legends of the Ancient Rock (Hard Rock/Heavy Metal)

6 November:

Genius – Spread Your Wings (Power Metal) [EP]

8 November:

Blind Guardian Twilight Orchestra – Legacy of the Dark Lands (Orchestral Metal)

Dimhav – The Boreal Flame (Progressive Power Metal)

Minotaurus – Victims of the Underworld (Folk Metal)

The Dark Element – Songs the Night Sings (Melodic Metal)

Pretty Maids – Undress Your Madness (Heavy Metal)

Tamás Szekeres – White Shapes of Blue (Neoclassical Metal)

Terminus – A Single Point of Light (Heavy Metal)

Tales of Evening – A New Dawn Awaits (Symphonic Gothic Metal)

9 November:

Alexander Layer – Huginn Muninn (Progressive Power Metal)

Caeli Metallum – Birth of the King (Heavy Metal)

13 November:

Cernunnos – The Svmmoner (Folk Metal)

Atavicus – Di eroica stirpe (Pagan Metal)

14 November:

Great Master – Skull and Bones – Tales from Over the Seas (Power Metal)

15 November:

Conjuring Fate – Curse of the Fallen (Heavy Power Metal)

CyHra – No Halos in Hell (Melodic Metal)

Crusade of Bards – Tales of Bards and Beats (Symphonic Metal)

Nibiru Ordeal – Solar Eclipse (Power Metal)

R.U.S.T.X. – Center of the Universe (Heavy Metal)

Scarleth – Vortex (Symphonic Metal)

Subterfuge – Prometheus (Progressive Metal)

Heaven Shore – Golden Age (Viking Metal)

Phenix – Ignition (Progressive Power Metal)

Dravernue – Proyecto D.A.G.D.A. (Power Metal)

A Persuasive Reason – A Persuasive Reason (Progressive Gothic Metal)

18 November:

Hibernia – Celtic Furor (Folk Metal)

20 November:

Black Sweet – The Lights (Heavy Power Metal)

Illusion Force – Alive (Power Metal)

21 November:

Serpentyne – Angels of the Night (Symphonic Folk Metal)

22 November:

Crystal Viper – Tales of Fire and ice (Heavy Metal)

Eleine – All Shall Burn (Symphonic Metal) [EP]

Magic Kingdom – MetAlmighty (Power Metal)

Redline – Gods and Monsters (Heavy Metal)

Signum Regis – The Seal of a New World (Progressive Power Metal)

Spnus Corona – Time Is Not on Your Side (Progressive Metal)

Thunder and Lightning – Demonicorn (Power Metal)

27 November:

Hizaki – Back to Nature (Symphonic Power Metal) [EP]

29 November:

Coronatus – The Eminence of Nature (Symphonic Folk Metal)

Celesti Alliance – Hybrid Generation (Heavy Power Metal)

Second Brain – The Mind Awakens (Progressive Metal)

Stormwarrior – Norsemen (Speed/Power Metal)

1 December:

Pagan Reign – Art of the Time (Pagan Black Metal)

Energema – A Christmas Night (Power Metal) [EP]

Dawnbreath – Creatures of the Damned (Heavy Metal)

6 December:

Crystal Eyes – Starbourne Traveler (Power Metal)

Human Fortress – Reign of Gold (Power Metal)

Power Theory – Force of Will (Heavy Power Metal)

The Murder of My Sweet – Brave Tin World (Gothic Metal)

Rhodium – Sea of the Dead (Heavy Power Metal)

At Night I Fly – Mirror Maze (Progressive Metal)

Infinitas – Infernum (Heavy Folk Metal)

Bellathrix – No Fear (Heavy Metal)

Steel Witch – In Moss and Fern (Heavy Metal)

Stormburner – Shadow Rising (Heavy Metal)

SL Theory – Cipher (Hard Rock/Heavy Metal)

Of the Cold – The Game (Power Metal) [EP]

The Old Dead Tree – The End (Gothic Metal) [EP]

Leaves’ Eyes – Black Butterfly (Symphonic Metal) [EP]

Burning Witches – Wings of Steel (Heavy Power Metal) [EP]

Burning Shadows – Beneath the Ruins (Heavy Power Metal) [EP]

Running Wild – Crossing the Blades (Heavy Power Metal) [EP]

10 December:

Flaming Row – The Pure Shine (Progressive Metal)

13 December:

Eregion – Age of Heroes (Power Metal)

18 December:

Gauntlet – Departure for the Frontier (Power Metal) [EP]

25 December:

Octaviagrace – Radiant (Progressive Power Metal)

27 December:

Ash-Slater – Reinception (Progressive Metal)

Master Sword – The Final Door (Power Metal)

Wind Rose – Wintersaga Review

Score9.5/10
GenrePower/Folk Metal
CountryItaly
Runtime49:59
Release Date27 September 2019
Record LabelNapalm Records

Well, summer’s over. That means the time for beaches, bimbos, and barbecues is at it’s end, being instead replaced by the dark, wind, and cold. However, this is the perfect season for a dwarf! And what better way to explore your potential dwarfhood than cranking out the meanest, mightiest of man-metal? Enter Wind Rose, Italy’s finest dwarf metal army, and their fourth album, Wintersaga. As the band’s most impressive album to date, it’s as if it was smithed in the forges of Khazad-dum itself. If its epic chants and upbeat hymns aren’t enough to get you into the season, they’ll at least get your blood flowing hard enough to keep you warm.

As usual, the Tolkein themes are strong in Wintersaga, as is evident in half of the song titles. Additionally, the album is split into two sections; the first contains the fun, catchy party tunes, and the second, which encompasses the final three songs, features a more power prog approach that hearkens to the band’s earlier works.

However, the core sound of Wind Rose has shifted as a whole from their progressive power metal roots to settle upon a more bombastic, anthemic sound in Wintersaga. Traces of their past are still present in the form of dynamic songs with multiple sections, especially in the nine-minute epic, ‘We Were Warriors’. There’s a heavy reliance on choirs and orchestrations to maintain an imposing atmosphere, but the heavy guitars and insane drumming give the album a mountainous foothold. On top of that, for such an in-your-face approach to metal, the transition between every section is seamless.

But the real power behind Wintersaga is the onslaught of chanted, mead-fueled folk melodies which would give even Alestorm a run for their money. Songs like ‘Drunken Dwarves’ and ‘The Art of War’ are sure to get all sorts of bottoms up. Even the heavier, more rugged refrains of ‘Diggy Diggy Hole’ and ‘Mine Mine Mine!’ will invoke a similar sense of merrymaking. The vocals are the lifeblood of this album, and they weld all the different pieces together.

Dwarf metal. How has such a simple idea never taken off as well as it has here? Besides running with a concept that simply makes sense for this kind of sound, the memorable arrangements and musicianship are as solid as can be, which makes Wintersaga amusing as well as a serious work of music.

If you want to be notified every time PowerThorn publishes a review or article, you can subscribe to the blog or go like the >>Facebook Page<<!
For all the same (but mostly memes), >>@PowerThorn<< on Instagram is exactly what you need.

Stay Metal \m/

Ereb Altor – Järtecken Review

Score8/10
GenreBlack/Viking Metal
CountrySweden
Runtime47:40
Release Date20 September 2019
Record LabelHammerheart

Ereb Altor are no stranger to viking metal. With eight albums since their 2008 debut, they’ve worked steadily to bring the best of true viking metal. Their latest album, Jartecken, is pretty much what you’d expect at this point, but that isn’t to say it isn’t something new, too; it continues down the same path as the past couple albums, delivering a dynamic mix of mournful folk melodies and vicious atmospheres.

Jartecken opens with building chants and cycles through floating clean vocal lines and ferocious growls over blast beats as it continues. While there are very intense sections even in the second track, ‘Queen of All Seas’, the album as a whole gets darker as it goes on. Needless to say, there’s a good mix of tracks, from the blackened-death metal of ‘Alliance in Blood’ to the thrashy ‘Prepare for War’ to the more epic ‘My Demon Inside’. The sense of impending darkness holds everything together, so there’s never a song or section that sounds out of place.

The guitars and synth function much the same in Jartecken, holding the foundation through ominous riffs and chords while the vocals and choirs pull the songs through the fog, so to speak. Well, that is of course with the exception of the guitar solos, which are in the foreground, as you’d expect. Behind it all are the drums, which are ever-changing with the overall mood.

My favourite aspect of Jartecken (and bands like Ereb Altor in general) is the fact that I can throw it on and get dialed into it almost instantly. There’s something about the overall dissonance of the music that just sucks me right in and flows around me like water. Sounds like pretentious bullshit, right? Well, despite being primarily a power metal guy, it’s that very aspect that has me coming back to records like this in the first place. It’s almost as if the album is just one big song, and that’s really cool.

All in all, this is a fantastic album. It’s nothing groundbreaking, but it offers enough difference from other albums in the space that it’s got a leg up on the competition. If you like dark, doomy, folky darkness of folk doom, give Jartecken a spin.

If you want to be notified every time PowerThorn publishes a review or article, you can subscribe to the blog or go like the >>Facebook Page<<!
For all the same (but mostly memes), >>@PowerThorn<< on Instagram is exactly what you need.

Stay Metal \m/

Interview With Elvenking’s Aydan

When you think about folk metal nowadays you maybe think of different stuff. . . Bands like Korpiklaani or Ensiferum, which are more on the extreme side. I think we are still something a little bit different.

Folk metal icons Elvenking were instrumental in the creation of the folk metal scene. Despite a few stylistic changes throughout their 20+ year career, they have always maintained a high level of quality and folky energy in every album. The band released their tenth album, Reader of the Runes – Divination, only a few days ago, and they continue to prove their place at the forefront of the genre. In the midst of such a busy time, the band’s songwriter and guitarist, Aydan, gave me the pleasure of sharing his thoughts on the making of Divination.

Kane: So, Elvenking has been around since 1997, which makes it as old as I am! How have you seen the folk metal stage in change since then?

Aydan: It’s interesting because when we started as a band in 1997, basically there was no folk metal scene at all. I mean, the only folk metal band we knew of were Skyclad from Britain. The communication in the metal world was different from now. So obviously there were some extreme metal bands or black metal bands that had the influences on the folkloristic music and stuff like that but there wasn’t really any folk metal scene existing at all.

Nowadays we are considered one of the originators of the scene but at the time we didn’t have a clue of what was happening. We just did the music we love and we mixed our heavy metal influences with some music coming from the mountains nearby, so it was really something different. Through the years, then, a lot of bands came out and the so-called “folk metal scene” had and still has lots of success.

That is one of the reasons why, through the years, we moved away from the scene and we also did two, three albums that were very distant from that, because we felt like, you know, we started something and then other bands came out and had more success than us so we wanted to show that we were able to do different good things. But from Pagan Manifesto on we went back to the origins of the band, to what the idea of the band was, both musically and lyrically. And, well, we’re still here nowadays!

I can imagine it’d be completely different than it is today, where it seems like there’s a new folk metal album or band every other week from some random town in Eastern Europe or something!

Yeah, exactly, something like that. [laughs] So, it’s kind of weird because it seems like it’s something that’s very. . . I don’t know. This folk metal stuff is coming out of everywhere, basically, so of course at the time it was very different. But we still try to be different as much as possible. As unique as possible. When you think about folk metal nowadays you maybe think of different stuff, maybe more extreme or more rough, let’s say. Bands like Korpiklaani or Ensiferum, which are more on the extreme side. I think we are still something a little bit different.

Yeah, there’s not as many that are closer to power metal like you guys are. Maybe Wind Rose or something but I think that’s it for the more popular bands.

Yeah, exactly. I don’t think that there are as many bands that are similar to us. I mean, obviously we have strong power metal influences and also a lot of stuff coming from some of the extreme metal scene of the 90s, like Swedish death metal and so on, and so there is still something different from what is out there, especially for the vocals, for example. Like the approach to the vocals, stuff like that.

So we always try to be as unique as possible, even though “originality” is a pretty hard word to use in music in general, because there is nothing “original” anymore, probably. But at least we try to be as recognizable as possible.

Absolutely. On the note of being unique, the first thing I noticed about your new album Divination is that it’s pretty distinct from even a lot of your guys’ own work. I found it a lot more heavy and guitar-oriented. Is that something that you guys intentionally did?

Yes, absolutely. We felt that, through the years, we were always kind of losing a lot of parts of our music, like the guitar work, which was always hidden behind a wall of orchestration or stuff. We really wanted to have this time more focus on the guitarwork and stuff like that, and we noticed that in the past we used to put an overlay, you know, a lot of stuff that, in the end, you can barely hear. There were a lot of arrangements that were really cool to listen to on their own but in the whole song it was basically messy because they were moving the attention away from the important melodies or the rhythms that we wanted to hear.

So it is something that I believe you need to learn with time. You know, when you are young, you always try to put stuff on stuff to show that you are cool enough to do all the arrangements. [laughs] But in the end, what really is important is what you should be focusing on so, through the years, we tried to get away from a lot of useless stuff and try to be as basic as possible in order for the listener to be understand exactly what is happening. If you want to have some heavy guitars, the only thing is just to delete all the useless stuff around the orchestration. That’s the only way to make it work properly.

Yeah, I noticed that even all the way up to Pagan Manfesto that there were tons and tons of folk instruments in the background and you can’t clearly hear a lot of them, and the guitars are way in the background. So it’s really nice to be able to actually hear really cool guitar parts.

Yeah, exactly, that’s the reason. You know, maybe there is a folk instrument there, and you write the part and you record it and say, “Yeah, this sounds really cool,” but then, maybe it’s overlayed to the vocals, so you need to keep it very low, and then, even if it’s low, you distract from the vocals, so you put it even lower, and in the end there’s a lot of things surrounding it but you can’t really focus on anything, so what we did with this album was say, “Ok, do we need this part? Is it something that is fundamental?” No; it’s cool, but you cannot put your attention there if there’s something else going on. So we really put the guitars on top this time and, when there was space, we went for something else. But I’m really happy with the production of this album and finally we have reached this goal that we had for a lot of years.

As a huge fan of you guys, I obviously like this album pretty much as much as I love all your other stuff, but are you happy with how other fans and critics have received it?

Well, you know, the album has just been released; it’s just a couple of days out. But what we have seen so far is that the reaction from the press is overwhelming and really beyond any expectation. You know, I had the feeling that the work we did this time was pretty okay, that it was good, and we had a good feeling about it, but the reaction from the journalists and the press went really beyond any expectation and we are getting a lot of good words and great evaluations and stuff like that.

For example, we put out limited edition box sets for the album that basically sold out already. I had the impression that the press copies were too many and I talked to the record label and said, “Ok, let’s do less,” and they said, “No, let’s do this,” and we sold out on the preorders. And the reactions from the fans so far are amazing, I would say.

Has there been any real negative feedback or does everybody just love it?

[laughs] No, well, you always have negative reviews or something like that. To be sincere, so far I have seen probably one review which was, like, five out of ten, but I have read it – you know, I don’t really read the reviews. I did the work, you know, and I care about more of what the fans say.

Of course.

But the only thing I read was that one bad review, but it was really, from what I read, like, “I hate this kind of metal,” and I thought, you know, ok. Honestly, what we used to receive as negative feedback was always what we put out as the first singles because, when you put out a single or a video or something like that, it’s always difficult because you have to choose one song to reflect an entire album. I think we are still too old school and we have the impression that the song is the part of the whole album that you would need to listen from the first one to the last one, taking a certain journey through the songs and reading the lyrics and trying to understand what is happening.

So it is very difficult for us to choose single songs to represent the entire album. You never know if it should be a melodic one, a commercial one, a heavy one. Now, we have told the record label, “Choose what you want,” because everything we choose is not always the right choice. When we put out a single there is always someone complaining, “Oh, this is too melodic,”, “This is too that,”, “It’s not good enough,”. It should be the mirror of the album but often it is not like that. So this is something that happens often for an album, and it happened with this one, but that’s pretty normal, I would say.

So you guys have had a pretty stable lineup for the past few years, except for a couple drummers. Did that have a big impact on how the album turned out?

I don’t want to say, “Not really,” but as you probably know, me and Damna, our singer, are the ones who write the music, as we always did. So I don’t want to say that lineup changes can’t affect the music, but it really didn’t, in this case, because the songwriting was not affected.

The fact that we have great people, great musicians, amazing people is a plus, and, in terms of recording, especially in this album, everyone did amazing work, especially how Lancs played the drums and recorded them in the studio, because everything you hear is pure natural drums. It’s probably the first time that we never used any trigger or samples on the drums because his drumming is so consistent. When we gave the recordings in to Dan Swanö for the mixing, he was absolutely impressed about how the drums were recorded and said, “Ok, guys, I think this is the first time in my life that I won’t use any samples or trigger on the drums! Even though it’s a metal album, it needs to be respected how it was played.”

And we wanted to have a very 90s production, still modern but as natural as possible, so that was possible thanks to the performances of everyone in the band, so that was great.

Was the songwriting process for this album very different from how you’ve done previous albums or was is business as usual?

It was actually different for the very first time because this is the very first concept album that we have done, even in the past if we have done, you know, themed albums, like The Scythe, for example. So, for the very first time, there was less freedom in the songwriting, because we needed to have the music follow the lyrics follow the story follow the atmospheres of the story. So, the songwriting wasn’t as before where we were like, “I have this song, let’s put it in this part,” It was more like, “What part of the story does this feed? What mood of the story should this be? What kind of atmosphere do we need to explain this part of the story?” So it was pretty different, I would say, and also pretty challenging. And also this is just part of the concept, because there will be at least two more albums in a longer concept.

What was your favourite part about making Divination?

Uh, well, songwriting itself is always my favourite part because it is always surprising what we come out with. Every time we finish the songwriting of an album, I feel like I did everything possible for the album and like I have no force to write anything else in the future [laughs] because you just feel, like, empty and so on. And it’s always surprising when you come out with something new. You start from an idea to form a full song and the song then becomes something that really works and then, obviously, hearing the final result is always something that you don’t imagine when you start songwriting. You don’t have a clue where the journey will bring you or how the songs in your mind will really come out, in the end.

And why did you guys decide to make this string of concept albums?

Well, for some years we’ve always had the idea of doing a concept album based on something that we wanted to tell, but we never had the right story or time to do it, I don’t know. When we came up with a story and decided that it was the right one, it was immediately clear that one album wouldn’t have been enough to contain all the story, and that we need to do it in different chapters. So, the idea to create a story that is and will be contained in more albums like the chapter of a story is something that attracted us immediately and we felt it was the right choice to do right now in this moment.

You know, as I told you, from the Pagan Manifesto on it was almost like we were reborn as a band. We tried to go back and rediscover the passion we had when we founded the band back in the day when we were just a bunch of kids with the passion to play music and to create lyrics and stories around it, and we kind of lost this feeling and this passion through the years. But when we decided to restart from that point, we did two albums [Pagan Manifesto, Secrets of the Magick Grimoire] and thought that now was a good time for this. And at that point, to be sincere, the reaction of the people to the band was becoming better and better, so we felt that this was the time, if we wanted to do a project like this, and to do it as epic as possible. So, that was the reason.

What’s your favourite thing about Reader of the Runes – Divination?

Uh [laughs] I like the album. I like really like the fact that we did a concept album that isn’t boring like a lot of concept albums. You know, sometimes you tend to make it as grandiose as possible in order to make it big and something like that, but this is the first thing that we wanted to avoid. It’s not that we want to make a concept album that is very difficult or very complex or something like that. We wanted the people to listen to it and to create songs that could work also live and so on, so I’m very happy that we created single songs that work well on the live side or by themselves, but also that, if you listen to the album beginning to the end, you can feel that there is something going on and there is a story behind that has atmospheres that change as it goes from very romantic parts to very heavy ones.

Yeah, I think that’s my favourite thing, too, is that it works really well both as a concept album and even if you shuffle it into a playlist, where they’re still great songs on their own.

Yeah, exactly. That was one of our goals. Even if you shuffle it and listen to one song, you should enjoy it. And if you listen to the whole thing, you have maybe a different impression, but it’s working good.

Another thing I thought was really cool was the rune puzzle you guys released before the album was even announced. Whose idea was that?

Oh, that was an idea that came out, to be sincere, from our record company. We have a new girl in the company that is taking care of our promotion, and she is super super great. She was especially really into our idea of music and all the concepts we had and she’s a fan of black metal and stuff like that. It’s the first time we have had someone like that because usually a record company prefers music that is more melodic, and the idea we were bringing to the table really didn’t fit their way of seeing things. But since this girl came in, she came up with the puzzle things and we immediately felt a close cooperation with her and a close connection. So she took care of it. We really have to thank her. She’s really really great and did amazing work with us on the album.

So we’re just about out of time here, but I do have one more question. You’re the last remaining original member of Elvenking, so I think it’s pretty safe to say that you love it, but do you have any desire to pursue other projects or other genres?

[laughs] This is a good question! You know, I always felt that I wanted to concentrate one-hundred percent on Elvenking because it was my band and I founded it when I was a kid and especially because this is the music I always wanted to do. You know, back in the day, I didn’t find a band that really one-hundred percent fit my needs, because I love the power metal but also the more extreme stuff and acoustic folk and stuff like that, so I wanted to do something on my own. And, in the end, I think that especially with these last albums this was the music that I wanted to do.

So I never felt the need to do something else. But, your question is interesting because, just the other day I realized that I have a lot of songs that do not fit Elvenking at all. I write music here and there and there is stuff that cannot be put on an Elvenking album, and I have the idea that I want to record something on my own that will obviously be pretty distant from Elvenking. And, for sure, I think it will be something very atmospheric and aethereal, something like piano and vocals and acoustic stuff. And I think I will do something like that pretty soon.

I can’t wait to hear what that brings. Thank you so much for taking the time to talk with me today!

A: Yes, thank you! It was a pleasure.

Elvenking’s tenth album, Reader of the Runes – Divination, is the first part of a multi-album concept. It’s available now on all major streaming platforms, or you can buy it from their >>website<<!

Elvenking – Reader of the Runes – Divination Review

If you want to be notified every time PowerThorn publishes a review or article, you can subscribe to the blog or go like the >>Facebook Page<<!
For all the same (but mostly memes), >>@PowerThorn<< on Instagram is exactly what you need.

Stay Metal \m/

Top Ten Metal Albums Of August

August regained the momentum of 2019 with tons of contenders for the best of the month! After careful consideration, I managed to pick out the Top Ten:

10. Ivory Tower – Stronger

Ivory Tower is no stranger to the prog scene. While they’ve only put out four albums since the late 90s, their sound has made plenty of changes, from power prog to nu metal. In their fifth album to date, Stronger, the band shows that the eight years since their previous album (which was, in all honesty, a fucking mess) have been dedicated to evolving their sound for the better. It’s full of super sick riffs, exciting songwriting, and vengeful melodies that often carry classic Queensryche vibes.

Full Review

9. Astralium – Land of Eternal Dreams

Astralium aren’t your typical, generic symphonic metal band. Land of Eternal Dreams marks one hell of a debut, and proves that these guys are a step above the rest. They manage to produce a bright, unique sound and, while some of their influences are vividly apparent at times (Nightwish, Amberian Dawn, and even Hans Zimmer), they do a great job at maintaining originality. The orchestrations are broad and epic, but they don’t overbear the guitars or vocals, which is a common mistake in the genre.

Full Review

8. Dialith – Extinction Six

The debut album from American symphonic metal outfit Dialith was an unexpected surprise this month. Extinction Six is a riff-heavy beast of a symphonic metal album, with guitarwork that’s as rich as its lively arrangements. All of this is under a strong female lead that delivers diverse melodies with emotion and precision.

7. Finsterforst – Zerfall

Furious German folkers Finsterforst are back with a fifth backbreaking album, complete with lengthy arrangements, chanted melodies, and intense orchestrations. Zerfall is a very unique take on folk metal, combining keyboards, orchestras, and heavy guitars with elements of death metal and folk melodies. The choruses have a slight ring of Orden Ogan to them that amplifies already-huge atmospheres, so it’s safe to say that you’re in for a pounding, heavy ride with this one.

6. Unprocessed – Artificial Void

German prog newcomers Unprocessed have returned with a bang in their sophomore record. Coming out only a year after their debut, Artificial Void shows that the band’s passion is burning hotter than ever before. The album still retains Unprocessed’s underlying, beefy djent feel, but it’s a farther progression into more experimental modern prog territory. Whether you’re looking for insanely deep riffs or choppy jams, Artificial Void delivers on all fronts.

Full Review

5. Scimitar – Shadows of Man

Canadian pagan metal warriors Scimitar have been around for just over a decade. Early on in their career, they released their debut album, Black Waters, but the band took a bit of a break soon after. Now, nine years later, the band have finally unleashed their sophomore album. Shadows of Man is gritty, furious, and packs way more variety into it than I would have ever expected. With a sound that’s in the realm of Ensiferum and Vanir (although far less refined, production-wise), Scimitar’s combination of death, black, and folk elements will be welcome with any fan of the dark side of folk metal.

Full Review

4. Elvenking – Reader of the Runes – Divination

Elvenking’s tenth album, Reader of the Runes – Divination, kicks all sort of ass, pagan-style. Fans will be pleased that Divination still retains the core Elvenking sound: a primarily-pop/punk vocal style, folk melodies, proggy song structure, and a power metal energy. Conversely, though, the album is as much a breath of fresh air as it is an Elvenking album, as it takes the band in two directions that they haven’t really explored in depth before; the road of Divination is generally darker and heavier than their previous material, and it also brings a whole concept that tells of a journey into a mystical world of runes and magic.

Full Review

3. Twilight Force – Dawn of the Dragonstar

Twilight Force’s third album, Dawn of the Dragonstar is full of unlimited, overblown, storybook energy. With the exception of maybe two moments, the album is consistently happy and heroic from the very first seconds of the galloping ‘Dawn of the Dragonstar’ into its final note. This hyper-melodic, smile-demanding work isn’t all sheen and shine, though; there’s an absolutely staggering degree of talent and proficiency to behold in every track.

Full Review

2. HammerFall – Dominion

Since their founding in 1993, heavy metal templars HammerFall have fought to continue the legacy of 80s heavy metal, smithing more than ten full-length records and establishing themselves as Sweden’s and Europe’s premier heavy metal masters. Their latest album, Dominion, is an epic powerhouse that easily contends with their early material in terms of quality and heart.

Full Review

1. NorthTale – Welcome to Paradise

NorthTale was born of vocalist Christian Eriksson (ex-Twilight Force), drummer Patrick Johansson (ex-Yngwie Malmsteem) and guitar maestro Bill Hudson with the dream of bringing back the glory of late 90s/early 00s power metal. Whether you’re in the mood for that golden-age power metal, anthemic stadium metal, or even a vegan happy meal, Welcome to Paradise delivers all that and more, complete with facemelting solos, diverse arrangements, and catchy melodies. This is one of the year’s best power metal albums and is as technically impressive as it is fun.

Full Review

If you want to be notified every time PowerThorn publishes a review or article, you can subscribe to the blog or go like the >>Facebook Page<<!
For all the same (but mostly memes), >>@PowerThorn<< on Instagram is exactly what you need.

Stay Metal \m/

Equilibrium – Renegades Review

Score3.5
GenreElectronic “Folk” Metal/Dance
CountryGermany
Runtime46:40
Release Date23 August 2019
Record LabelNuclear Blast

Imagine yourself in a simpler time. A time, perhaps, where you’re me. June is almost over, and one of your favourite folk metal bands, Equilibrium, just released a new single to their upcoming album. ‘Renegades – A Lost Generation’ is super poppy, sure, but its sick riffage combined with its heavy electronic booming is enough to get me excited. A lot of fans are furious at such a preview, but not you. You dig bombast with a side of catchy. So, naturally, you spend the next two months eagerly anticipating Renegades in all its thumping, dancing, metal glory.

But then it comes. It knocks on the door of your heart as you download it and press play for the first time. Your friend, ‘A Lost Generation’ greets you, but he’s brought his friends this time. Except, these aren’t the kind of guys you want to hang out and party with. No, they’re not. They’re some sketchy fuckers, and not the type you’d expect ‘A Lost Generation’ to hang around, either. As they enter, they beat the living piss out of you. One by one. Every minute or so, one of them puts on a different face: a caring face, asking you if you need anything. But, before you can respond, they change right back, smacking whatever hopeful expression you had on your dumb, unfortunate, betrayed face, and continue pounding your stupid ass. Toward the end of this slaughter, though, another walks in. ‘Hype Train’ enters, wipes you off, kisses your forehead, and tells you it’s there for you. Just as you put your faith in her hands, though, it’s stripped off again by the final douchebag of the evening, who spits on your motionless body, leaving you sad and alone.

Fun ride, huh? That’s pretty well how I felt listening to it. Needless to say, Equilibrium have invoked all of my fury and then some, because this is some serious bullshit. I’m not gonna sit here and bitch about how Equilibrium aren’t folk metal anymore, because everybody was expecting it after their previous album especially. Renegades features almost no folk elements, save for some synth interludes or intros/outros, but even those are probably just coincidental, because they follow the same lines as a lot of popular EDM does. But, whatever. I’m over it. What I’m not over, however, is the fact that, despite such a capable lineup and clear ease of executing a solid mix of electronic/pop/heavy metal, Renegades manages to pump out almost nothing but uninspired garbage, except for two songs (which I mentioned before).

Let me break it down a bit. Rather than making something cool and catchy, Equilibrium have just put together an album full of EDM and radio pop tropes that are masked behind bombast and massively heavy guitars and vocals in an effort to hide their overdone, simplistic faces. But that won’t work on me. I see you, mediocrity. I fucking see you, and no amount of flare or weight can hide you. ‘Tornado’ and ‘Himmel und Feuer’ are fine examples of this, where, if you stripped off the thin metal exterior, you’d be left with nothing but some sorry kid on Soundcloud trying to be discovered.

But not all of the songs follow this formula. No, some of the songs are just outright lost causes. Take ‘Path of Destiny’ for example. Who in the god damn brought this Luke-Bryan-makes-an-Apple-commercial idea to the show? Not gonna fly here, no sir. Surprisingly, the best part is actually the rapping in the bridge, which I could handle if the rest of the song wasn’t nu country ass. ‘Johnny B’ also brings its fair share of disappointment in the vein of Owl City (remember them? People listened to them in 2012 for some reason). But these two don’t even hold a candle to ‘Kawaarki’. This reject from the emo/metalcore scene of the late 00s is so unworldly irritating that it actually burned all of the fingers off every pair of gloves in my house. Get this “rawr XD’ shit out of my house. It’s 2019 for Christ’s sake.

Now, in an effort to try to end this review on a more positive note, Renegades does have a few good things to offer. If I went to a party and it was playing, I could handle it. Also, like I mentioned, ‘A Lost Generation’ and ‘Hype Train’ kick all sorts of ass, and, if the rest of the album were more on that side of things, it’d’ve been everything I wanted it to be. Additionally, there are a few cool drum fills and riffs scattered throughout, but for the lengths you have to travel to find them, it’s just not worth it. Honestly, you should still check this album out. It’s unique, to say the least, and there’s such a variety of tracks that you’ll probably like something.

If you want to be notified every time PowerThorn publishes a review or article, you can subscribe to the blog or go like the >>Facebook Page<<!
For all the same (but mostly memes), >>@PowerThorn<< on Instagram is exactly what you need.

Stay Metal \m/

Elvenking – Reader Of The Runes – Divination Review

Score8.5/10
GenreFolk Metal
CountryItaly
Runtime52:25
Release Date30 August 2019
Record LabelAFM

It’s not very often that a band that’s been around for more than five albums maintains a steady level of greatness in every release. I’m not just talking about a solid discography with album or two being considered “passable”, but rather a track record in which every album is, at the very least, great. It’s not unheard of by any means, and it’s ultimately contingent on whom you ask, but there are certainly some bands that are widely-regarded to just be really fucking good.

For us in the metal community, names like Iron Fire, Blind Guardian, Zeppelin, or Queen might make the cut. However, for myself, I would put Elvenking at the top of my no-less-than-great list. This doesn’t necessarily mean that they’re my favourite band of all time (although, they are close), but it means that I think that they’re a band that is almost incapable of putting out something even close to bad; they haven’t yet.

So, it should come as no surprise that the folk masters’ tenth album, Reader of the Runes – Divination, kicks all sort of ass, pagan-style. Fans will be pleased that Divination still retains the core Elvenking sound: a primarily-pop/punk vocal style, folk melodies, proggy song structure, and a power metal energy. Conversely, though, the album is as much a breath of fresh air as it is an Elvenking album, as it takes the band in two directions that they haven’t really explored in depth before; the road of Divination is generally darker and heavier than their previous material, and it also brings a whole concept that tells of a journey into a mystical world of runes and magic.

Aside from the songwriting and atmosphere, the instrumentation (obviously) is what mainly contributes to the difference in sound that you’ll find here compared to every album prior. There are huge choirs, such as in ‘Reader of the Runes – Book I’, and plentiful vocal tracks that seem to substitute what used to be rampant folk instruments. Additionally, the guitars have stepped up from the background right into the forefront as the driving force of the songs, even more so than the violin, acoustic guitar, string tracks, or drums combined. Speaking of the drums, Lancs‘ style is a lot steadier and heavier than the band’s previous patter-style drummer, Symohn, who parted ways with the band in 2017. This difference was obviously also present in Secrets of the Magick Grimoire, but it’s even more apparent next to the guitar’s new-found presence. Finally, the folk influences are dialed down quite a bit here, too, so the result of all of this is a heavier, more intense, more metal album.

In case you didn’t already assume, Divination has a bit of a variety to offer. Just kidding, it’s all over the fucking map. There are more typical tracks like ‘Heathen Divine’ (which is very Pagan Manifesto) and the laid back ‘Eternal Eleanor’, but there are also songs that stretch the boundaries a bit more, due to all the stuff in that big paragraph above. Most notably, however, we have ‘Malefica Doctrine’, which is drenched in melodeath and stands as the heaviest song in Elvenking’s twenty-plus-year career.

While I wouldn’t call this one Elvenking’s best (because that title would go to Pagan Manifesto), it’s still a killer album. The concept fits, it’s super dynamic, and it has a high headbangability factor. If you were hoping for a very folky album, you won’t get it here. However, I think that old fans will enjoy the hell out of Divination and newcomers will get hooked on it, too.

If you want to be notified every time PowerThorn publishes a review or article, you can subscribe to the blog or go like the >>Facebook Page<<!
For all the same (but mostly memes), >>@PowerThorn<< on Instagram is exactly what you need.

Stay Metal \m/

Scimitar – Shadows Of Man Review

Score8/10
GenrePagan Metal
CountryCanada
Runtime48:57
Release Date23 August 2019
Record LabelIndependent

Canadian pagan metal warriors Scimitar have been around for just over a decade. Early on in their career, they released their debut album, Black Waters, but the band took a bit of a break soon after. Now, nine years later, the band have finally unleashed their sophomore album. Shadows of Man is gritty, furious, and packs way more variety into it than I would have ever expected. With a sound that’s in the realm of Ensiferum and Vanir (although far less refined, production-wise), Scimitar’s combination of death, black, and folk elements will be welcome with any fan of the dark side of folk metal.

Scimitar’s strength lies in their ability to craft a massive sound as a whole. The band mostly moves together in one direction at a time, which allows for a lot of power to be propelled at once. Additionally, melody is far down on the list of priorities, and what melody there is is driven only by the lead guitar, which is responsible for most of the emotion that comes out of whatever atmosphere the rest of the band is holding.

Shadows of Man begins with a dynamic instrumental (which, by the way, is an actual song, and not just minute-long bullshittery) before changing pace with ‘Knights Collapse’, which is pretty laid back. The growled vocals are almost rapped, which is cool, and the overall feel in this one is distinctly different from everything else the album offers. As the album progresses there are plenty of changes but its raw, rhythmic, aggressive energy remains fully consistent.

One thing you’ll notice about Shadows of Man is that it gets heavier as it goes on. While the earlier tracks are lighter and more melodic in comparison, the album ramps the intensity way the fuck up upon entering ‘Shadows of Man II: Cataclysm’: a melodic death metal landscape where dissonant chords and harshness take dominance.

There isn’t much that I don’t like about this album, but there are a few favourites for me. The solos are great, with the solo section in ‘Imperium’ being my favourite. Also, while the whole album is very dynamic, this reaches a peak in ‘Where Ancient Spectres Lie’, where we’re bombarded with time changes and feel changes, from its immensely depressive intro to the brighter end section. My favourite aspect about Shadows of Man, however, is the bass; you can hear it well and the lines are awesome. That probably seems like a weird favourite to pick in a record like this, but, fuck it. I love it.

In a departure from their original sound, Shadows of Man elevates Scimitar to a higher, more mature level. Back with their first effort (and a solid effort it is!) in years, Scimitar have sliced their way back onto the scene.

If you want to be notified every time PowerThorn publishes a review or article, you can subscribe to the blog or go like the >>Facebook Page<<!
For all the same (but mostly memes), >>@PowerThorn<< on Instagram is exactly what you need.

Stay Metal \m/